Bob Doppelt “From Me to We” podcast

http://dharmaseed.org/talks/audio_player/501/18313.html

We expand our choices by altering our interpretation of the world…

Climate change and growing economic inequities and other problems we’re facing today are really not technical problems [nor policy, energy, or fossil fuel problems], it’s a crisis of human thought and imagination.

Highly recommended talk from Bob Doppelt about how to align one’s understanding and behavior with ancient spiritual precepts… which happen to also be “how to live sustainably.”  (This is a great example of the kind of content we’ll have in the Sust Enable film through asking questions like “what does sustainability mean?”)

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Across Distances, Common Threads: The Catalyzing Moment When I Knew I Must Make “Sust Enable: The Metamentary”

I sat in my quiet, still, squatted bedroom one morning in April 2010.  It was a clear, sunny, and sweetly cool day–the open window welcomed a fresh breeze.  Finally feeling a little bit safe after months of reflection and writing, still raw from the psychic turbulence of having many of my assumptions about sustainability confronted, I picked up a printout of the very first article I had found using a Google Scholar search on the term “sustainability,” with the gentle notion that I was finally ready to start my research into what other people working on “sustainability” issues had to say about it.  This article was the top-listed one from the search I had conducted a day prior.  The article was “A Complexity Approach to Sustainability,” by A. Espinosa, R. Harnden, and J. Walker, published in the European Journal of Operational Research in 2008.  To know what others were writing and thinking about sustainability would help me develop my feature documentary film idea, I thought.  What happened next was a great shock.

It seemed that every academic argument made in this article aligned perfectly with the substantial revelations I made since the Sust Enable episode series went awry in 2008.  My most significant felt lessons from the collapsed Sust Enable project were being reinforced and affirmed on the level of this random, popular peer-reviewed publication about cybernetics.

At the line “this paper argues the need to wield analytical tools that themselves embody the principles of systemic, ecological thinking,” I gasped and uttered “oh my god!” to myself under my breath, as I remembered how the 2008 Sust Enable series failed to effectively achieve “100% sustainability” in part because the negative, critical, stressful production environment produced low-quality footage and an incomplete story.  I recalled my resulting commitment to produce a systemically-sustainable film the next time around.

At the article’s explanation about how organisms are “braided” or “coupled” to their particular environment, and that, given this, no objectivity is possible, but the most accurate judgments would be derived from considering the organism within the context of its environment, I couldn’t help but see the connection to my vision–that the new film incorporate ongoing critiques of the film’s own processes into the construction of the film’s story–as being the same core idea as braiding.  My breathing had unconsciously sped up; I stood up and began pacing around the room.  The authors were so far from me in their orientation, education, and research methods, yet their words struck so close to my experiences… how was this possible?

By the end of the article, with its comments on “wide and democratic participation,” “stakeholder involvement,” “complexity management” and “breakthrough process,” my tears were flowing.  I saw how my experiences since Sust Enable 2008, and my ideas for a film inspired from the flaws of my first attempt, might indeed be a very important story to tell.  Other people in very different fields and using different methods are discovering the same things I am about the meaning of sustainability… but I might be uniquely positioned to turn these lessons into a creative documentary film.  Reading through the Espinosa article again now, I still get chills.  It’s hard to express how substantial that day was for me in setting me on the journey toward Sust Enable: The Metamentary.

Ever since, I cannot shake the feeling that there may be some kind of universal nature of sustainability, as natural as the existence of water or of life.  Our current social agitation around issues of sustainability may be indicative that we are on the verge of (re)discovering a kind of “natural law”, which could guide us about how we are to live, and live well, as inhabitants of Earth.

And I believe that each and every human can know what sustainability means, and looks like, and feels like.  In fact, staking an independent claim to this word, and trusting only your own experiences and body to guide you, is key to developing a unique, individual sensitization to sustainability issues that will only further enrich our dialogs.

Some of us have more opportunities to explore sustainability–like people of native cultures, who are much more concerned with their lifestyle’s local and direct “sustainability” (the braiding of lifestyle to environment) than a civilized person whose Western-derived mega-culture relies on technology that commodifies everything, divorces goods from sources, attacks us with messages constantly reinforcing our inadequacy, frustrates meaningful community, and externalizes industrial costs across the planet.  Yet if scientists in an academic critical context could discover the same themes of sustainability that I too had identified through certain dramatic personal experiences during Sust Enable 2008 (and beyond), what does this say about the significance of sharing our experiences and visions for sustainability with one another?  What does this say about our interconnectedness, our collective consciousness?  What does this say about our gift for insight, and our subsequent obligation to act wisely?  What does this say of the potential for us to join forces to solve complex, interrelated problems?

One of the premises of the current, updated Sust Enable project is self-determination and reflexivity: we don’t have to rely on economic or governmental authorities to figure out what sustainability means on our behalf–we can uncover important insight into sustainable living just by tapping into our own unique and diverse realities.  Sust Enable: The Metamentary compares diverse interviewee commentary about the meaning of sustainability with footage of a simple life transforming over time, in an attempt to find supporting evidence for common sustainability principles everywhere–even in mundane human experiences.  To prove that this insight is ours to take–that we will be the generation to define sustainability, and that we will, in all our wisdom and freedom, get to clarify and renew humanity’s most sacred and most fulfilling work on this planet.

Do you think sustainability probably has an intrinsic nature, universal to all living things?  Why or why not?  If so, do you think we could ever articulate a universally applicable definition of sustainability?

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Live: Greenpeace activists attach themselves to anchor of Russian ship assisting oil-drilling rig in the Arctic

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What does it mean when human beings, and high profile ones at that, put their lives on the line to defend against a perceived threat to future lives?

These Greenpeace activists, which include their International director, have attached themselves in a small motorboat to the anchor of a massive ship poised to assist in completing the construction of an oil rig in the Arctic.  Their sign proclaims “Do Not Destroy Our Children’s Futures.”  How do these activists connect their “children’s futures” to the issue of this boat completing an oil rig?

On the level of our biological reality, the molecular building blocks of life (water, carbon, etc.) all interconnect and blend together through global systems.  These people seem to be identifying their lives with the importance of the biological quality of life of their children’s futures–which they connect to whether or not more carbon-based fossil fuel is drilled and burned.

For many millenia, humans could survive and thrive on the assumption that our lives would be relatively free from toxic pollutants and extreme weather and temperature fluctuations that could wildly skew our ability to manage our food and water, and destroy species diversity.  But now, can we really say that anymore?  Oil drilling and burning has produced these effects in our lives on a planet-wide scale.  My generation (I was born in 1986) is a generation not just of traditional cyborgs (whose identities are made up of both natural and technological systems), but also we have been biologically shaped by the technological consequences of our recent ancestors.  People my age and younger will have never interacted with the world the way humans had for thousands of years–we cannot experience the world as being predominantly determined by a vast network of self-regulating systems.  My generation’s only “natural” interactions have been with a thoroughly human-influenced landscape, whether we are considering land use, forests, fresh water, atmospheric makeup, or other biological factors once strictly considered in the “natural” domain.

What kind of consequences will this have on my generation’s consciousness?  I think this photograph of direct action, in which people are putting their immediate bodies in danger in an effort to secure the safety and well-being of a broader living system, is something we will begin to see much more of.

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